Pula

Pula is the largest city in Istria County, Croatia, situated at the southern tip of the Istria peninsula, with a population of 62,080 (2006). Like the rest of the region, it is known for its mild climate, smooth sea, and unspoiled nature. The city has a long tradition of winemaking, fishing, shipbuilding, and tourism. Pula has also been Istria’s administrative centre since ancient Roman times.

Tourism

The natural beauty of Pula’s surrounding countryside and turquoise water of the Adriatic have made the city an internationally popular summer vacation destination. The pearl nearby is Brijuni national park visited by numerous world leaders since it was the summer residence of Josip Broz Tito. Roman villas and temples still lie buried among farm fields and along the shoreline of the dozens of surrounding fishing and farming villages. The coastal waters offer beaches, fishing, wreck dives to ancient Roman galleys and World War I warships, cliff diving, and sailing to unspoiled coves and islands large and small.

Pula is the end point of the EuroVelo 9 cycle route that runs from Gdańsk on the Baltic Sea through Poland, the Czech Republic, Austria, Slovenia and Croatia.

It is possible to track dinosaur footprints on the nearby sea shores; certain more important finds have been made at an undisclosed location near Bale.

In 2008 Pula Tourist Board with Parabureau design agency initiated the project of branding the City of Pula. The project won The Rebrand 100 Global Award.

Transportation

Pula/Pola had an electric tramway system in the early 20th century. It was built in 1904 as a part of Pula’s economic crescendo during the Austro-Hungarian rule. After WWI, during the Fascist rule, the need for tram transportation declined and it was finally dismantled in 1934.

Pula Airport is located north-east of Pula/Pola, and serves both domestic and international destinations. Similarly to nearby Rijeka Airport, it is not a major international destination. However, this is likely to change as low-cost airline, Ryanair has started scheduled flights to Pula since November 2006. Jet2 also offer flights from Newcastle, Birmingham, Glasgow, Leeds-Bradford, Belfast, Manchester and East Midlands Airports. Nearby international airports include Trieste in Italy, Zagreb, Croatia’s capital and Ljubljana, Slovenia’s capital. There are direct flights into Pula airport from London and Dublin during whole year and several other large airports in Western Europe during summer.

A train service operates north from Pula/Pola through to Slovenia, however the line remains disconnected from the rest of the Croatian Railways network. Plans to tunnel the ‘missing link’ between this line and from Rijeka have existed for many years, and despite work commencing on this project previously, has never seen completion.

Buses serve Pula/Pola from a wide range of local, domestic and international locations and operate from the large bus terminal on the edge of the city centre. Public bus operation is run by Pulapromet. There is also guaranteed one direct line from Pula/Pola to Trieste, especially into spring/summer time.

Passenger ferries also operate from the port area to nearby islands, and also to Venice and Trieste in Italy from June till September.

Geography and climate

The city lies on and beneath seven hills on the inner part of a wide gulf and a naturally well-protected port (depth up to 38 metres (125 ft)) open to the northwest with two entrances: from the sea and through Fažana channel.

Today, Pula’s geographical area amounts to 5,165 hectares (12,760 acres), 4,159 hectares (10,280 acres) on land and 1,015 hectares (2,510 acres) at sea, bounded from the north by islands Sv. Jerolim and Kozada, city areas Štinjan, Veli Vrh and Šijanic forest; from the east area Monteserpo, Valmade, Busoler and Valdebek; from the south with the old gas works, commercial port Veruda and island Veruda; and from the west Verudela, Lungomare and Musil.

Protected from the north by the mountain chain of Alps as well the inner highland, the climate is Mediterranean, very pleasant, with the highest air temperature averaging 24 °C (75 °F) during August and lowest averaging 6 °C (43 °F), in January. Summers are usually warm during the day and cooler near the evening, although some strange heat wave patterns are also common.

Normally, there is a lot of moisture in the air. Temperatures above 10 °C (50 °F) last for more than 240 days a year. There are two different kinds of winds here – the bura brings cold and clear weather from the north in winter, and the southern jugo (jug=south) bringing rain in summer. The ‘Maestral’ is a summer breeze blowing from the inland to the sea.

Like the rest of the region Pula is known for its mild climate, tame sea, and unspoiled nature with an average of sunny days of 2,316 hours per year or 6.3 hours a day, with an average air temperature of 13.7 °C (56.7 °F) (6.1 °C (43.0 °F) in February to 26.4 °C (79.5 °F) in July and August) and sea temperature from 7 °C (45 °F) to 26 °C (79 °F).

[hide]Climate data for Pula
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 10
(50)
10
(50)
13
(55)
16
(61)
21
(70)
25
(77)
28
(82)
28
(82)
24
(75)
20
(68)
14
(57)
10
(50)
18.25
(64.85)
Average low °C (°F) 2
(36)
2
(36)
4
(39)
8
(46)
12
(54)
16
(61)
18
(64)
18
(64)
15
(59)
12
(54)
7
(45)
4
(39)
9.8
(49.6)
Rainfall mm (inches) 78
(3.07)
64
(2.52)
65
(2.56)
70
(2.76)
56
(2.2)
53
(2.09)
48
(1.89)
75
(2.95)
85
(3.35)
85
(3.35)
80
(3.15)
112
(4.41)
871
(34.3)
Source: EuroWeather