Trogir

Trogir is a historic town and harbour on the Adriatic coast in Split-Dalmatia County, Croatia, with a population of 10,818 (2011) and a total municipality population of 13,260 (2011). The historic city of Trogir is situated on a small island between the Croatian mainland and the island of Čiovo. It lies 27 kilometres (17 miles) west of the city of Split.

Since 1997, the historic centre of Trogir has been included in the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites.

Main sights

Trogir has 2300 years of continuous urban tradition. Its culture was created under the influence of the ancient Greeks, and then the Romans, andVenetians. Trogir has a high concentration of palaces, churches, and towers, as well as a fortress on a small island, and in 1997 was inscribed in the UNESCO World Heritage List. “The orthogonal street plan of this island settlement dates back to the Hellenistic period and it was embellished by successive rulers with many fine public and domestic buildings and fortifications. Its beautiful Romanesque churches are complemented by the outstanding Renaissance and Baroque buildings from the Venetian period”, says the UNESCO report.

Trogir is the best-preserved Romanesque-Gothic complex not only in the Adriatic, but in all of Central Europe. Trogir’s medieval core, surrounded by walls, comprises a preserved castle and tower and a series of dwellings and palaces from the Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque periods. Trogir’s grandest building is the church of St. Lawrence, whose main west portal is a masterpiece byRadovan, and the most significant work of the Romanesque-Gothic style in Croatia.

The most important sites include:

  • Historical city core, with about 10 churches and numerous buildings from 13th century
  • The city gate (17th century) and city walls (15th century)
  • The Fortress Kamerlengo (15th century)
  • The Duke’s Palace (13th century)
  • The Cathedral (13th century) with the Portal of Master Radovan, the unique work of this Croatian artist
  • The big and small palaces Cipiko from the 15th century
  • The city loggia from 15th century

Economy

Tourism is the most important economic factor in the Trogir region, covering 50% of the municipal budget with more than 20,000 beds in hotels and private apartments. There is also a strong fishing and agriculture tradition among the population in surrounding areas.

The most important industry is shipbuilding, with shipyard “Trogir” established at the beginning of the 20th century. The shipyard has a capacity of two ships of 55,000 tons. Between 1990 and 2004, 93 ships were built in the shipyard.

Infrastructure

Trogir lies six kilometers (4 miles) from Split Airport, and a regular bus connects Trogir with the airport and Split. In the future, the Split Suburban Railway will be lengthened towards the airport and Trogir.

Water supply to Trogir is sourced from the Jadro River, the source that once supplied the ancient Diocletian’s Palace.

Climate

Climate in this area has mild dfferences between highs and lows, and there is adequate rainfall year round. TheKöppen Climate Classification subtype for this climate is “Cfb” (Marine West Coast Climate/Oceanic climate).Climate in this area has mild dfferences between highs and lows, and there is adequate rainfall year round. The Köppen Climate Classification subtype for this climate is “Cfb” (Marine West Coast Climate/Oceanic climate).

[hide]Climate data for Trogir
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 11
(51)
12
(53)
14
(57)
17
(62)
22
(71)
26
(78)
29
(84)
29
(84)
25
(77)
21
(69)
15
(59)
12
(53)
19.4
(66.5)
Average low °C (°F) 3
(37)
4
(39)
6
(42)
8
(46)
12
(53)
16
(60)
18
(64)
18
(64)
15
(59)
11
(51)
7
(44)
5
(41)
10.3
(50)
Source: Weatherbase