Šibenik

Šibenik is a historic town in Croatia, located in central Dalmatia where the river Krka flows into the Adriatic Sea. Šibenik is a political, educational, transport, industrial and tourist center of Šibenik-Knin county.

Climate

Šibenik has a Mediterranean climate, with mild, humid winters and hot, dry summers. January and February are the coldest months, July and August are the hottest months. In July the average maximum temperature is around 30 °C (86 °F). The Köppen Climate Classification subtype for this climate is “Cfa” (Humid Subtropical Climate).

Main sights

The central church in Šibenik, the Cathedral of St. James, is on the UNESCO World Heritage list.

Several successive architects built it completely in stone between 1431 and 1536, both in Gothic and in Renaissance style. The interlocking stone slabs of the Cathedral’s roof were damaged when the city was shelled by Serbian forces in 1991. The damage has since been repaired.

In the town of Šibenik there are four fortresses:

  • St. Nicholas Fortress (Croatian: Tvrđava Sv. Nikole) is a fortress located at sea, at the entrance of Šibenik’s port.
  • Tvrđava Sv. Mihovila
  • Tvrđava Sv. Ivana
  • Tvrđava Šubićevac

Natural heritage

  • Roughly 18 kilometres (11 mi) north of the city is the Krka National Park, similar to the more famous Plitvice Lakes National Park, renowned for its many waterfalls, flora, fauna, and historical and archaeological remains.

The Kornati archipelago, west of Šibenik, consists of 150 islands in a sea area of about 320 km2 (124 sq mi), making it the densest archipelago in the Mediterranean Sea.

Culture and events

The annual Šibenik International Children’s Festival (Međunarodni Dječji Festival) takes place every summer. Since 2011 the Terraneo festival is held in august on a yearly basis on a former military area in Šibenik. The composer Jakov Gotovac founded the city’s “Philharmonia Society” in 1922. The composer Franz von Suppé was part of the city’s cultural fabric, as he was a native of nearby Split.

Utilities

The town of Šibenik was the first city in the world to receive a polyphase system of alternating current. The system supplied 340 street lights and some electrified houses in the town